Lessons from kite flying

English: Multicolored nylon lattice delta kite...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A simple discipline of flying a kite teaches me much about leading the church.

Wait for the wind.

Sure I can get a kite to fly by running and pulling its string. But without a little outside help I’ll run out of steam and give up.

Sure I can worship God by myself. But without a little outside help I’ll run out of steam and give up.

Let out some string.

If I hold my kite close, it won’t crash. But if I let out some string a fortunate gust might lift it above the turbulence near the ground to where it can soar.

I can design a theologically informed and adequate worship service. But if I let others, even those without a seminary degree, help with the planning, a fortunate idea might lift it from adequate to superb.

Hold fast to make it soar.

A steady breeze will pull a kite down range slowly lifting it as it goes. But holding the string taut while the breeze is strong will tip it upward rising it to new heights and the string will sing.

An exciting production will pull a congregation along slowly lifting it as it goes. But holding fast to Jesus Christ, crucified and risen, the solid foundation of our faith, will tip the congregation upward focused on raising songs to God.

Let out more string.

When the wind eases, give the string some slack so the kite can flatten on the air and float down range. Then when the wind stiffens hold fast to soar again.

Allow volunteers to rest from time to time, so they can recognize soaring when the spirit moves them.

Let others hold the string.

Sure I can fly a kite by myself, especially here in wind-swept Indiana. But teaching someone to judge the wind and rise the kite to new heights is an added thrill.

When volunteers take leadership of an event, I get cheer their successes.

 

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