Monthly Archives: February 2012

Rolled Eggplant

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 large eggplant
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • 3 teaspoon Italian herbs
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 10 ounces spinach, defrost if frozen
  • 12 ounces tomato sauce / marinara
  • 1 ounce mozzarella cheese

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. In a pie plate, stir egg until smooth.

    Eggplant breaded and baked.
    Eggplant breaded and baked.
  3. In a separate pie plate, mix bread crumbs and herbs.
  4. Slice eggplant lengthwise into long, thin (1/4″ 5mm) slices.
  5. Dip eggplant slices in egg and bread crumbs and arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet.
  6. Bake slices for 5 minutes, turn over, then bake for another 5 minutes.
  7. Spread cheese on slices.

    Eggplant filled and rolled.
    Eggplant filled and rolled.
  8. Spread spinach on slices.
  9. Roll slices and place seam side down in a 8″ x 10″ baking dish.
  10. Pour sauce over rolls.
  11. Sprinkle mozzarella over the sauce.
  12. Bake until hot and bubbly, ~20 minutes.

March 4th: “Forgiving Enemies”

This Week’s Passage: Jonah 4

Highlights: The sailors repent, the whole city of Nineveh repents, but the hero of the story, Jonah, never actually repents nor asks forgiveness, unless it is what happens after the story ends. The open ending allows each reader to writer his or her name in the epilog, extending pity on those who would turn from righteousness.

I. Establish the text

C. Other texts for Year B for 2nd Sunday in Lent

D. Brainstorm: What questions/thoughts come to mind?

1 Need to recap what Jonah found displeasing.

2 What is Jonah quoting?

3 Jonah had been an instrument of grace to people who merited death. People who might now live to kill again.

4 When do we get angry with God?

5 Had they really repented? Or was their change of heart merely for show? A political expedience?

6-8 Did Jonah interpret the bush first as God offering Jonah a kindness then arbitrarily taking that gift away? How do we find God’s actions inexplicable?

9-11 Recast Nineveh as the supporters of a tyrannical dictator, men who would starve or slay their neighbors, their family. Might the bush then be winning lottery ticket swept away by an unexpected gust?

E. Reconsider where the text begins and ends: What got chopped out?

  • The well known fish story, Jonah’s whale-belly prayer, his reluctant prophecy to Nineveh and their repentance have been omitted. These must be recapped for the congregation.

II. Literary Study.

A. What is the history of the text? Who wrote it? When? In what social context? What Historical/Religious/Sociological factors influenced its writing?

  • Although placed in the canon among the prophets, its style evokes a timeless moral lesson.

C. Review syntax/meanings of critical words, phrases, idioms

  • This passage contrasts anger and pity.

III. Question the text.

A. Observe the passage from the perspective of its characters.

Told as omniscient third person. The author knows both the mind of Jonah and the mind of God.

God teaches Jonah an important lesson.

Jonah refuses to repent of his anger for Nineveh and for God. The abrupt ending leaves the reader hoping Jonah might yet turn to God.

B. Are there any unusual details? Un-named characters? ‘Pointless’ description? Meanings of names of characters? What does a literal meaning of natural metaphors imply?

A bush growing tall enough to provide shade over night would be miraculous. Its death in a night less so.

C. What is the center of gravity of the text? Where was the author heading? What question did the author intend to answer? What is the emotional center of the text? What music would it call for?

  • Center of Gravity: God’s mercy is broader than our mercy.
  • Emotional Center: Who would we deny grace? When might we accuse God of injustice by excessive grace?
  • Music: “In Christ There Is No East Nor West”

D. Look for conflict: stated or implied.

  • Mercy or justice for Nineveh and the injustice perpetrated upon the victims of Nineveh.
  • Conflict with God for seeming arbitrary in distributing discomfort.

E. Is there anything you wish the author had included in the passage? Why do you think this was not a part of Scripture?

  • What happens to Nineveh? Does their repentance last? – Absent to allow the reader to infer that they return to their old ways, as do many who quickly repent.
  • What happens to Jonah? Does he repent? – Absent to allow the reader to hope that Jonah might see the light and turn to the ways of God.
  • As narrative, this book needs two more chapters: an action chapter where Jonah repents of his anger against God and celebrates grace with the Ninevites; and a meditative chapter where Jonah returns to Jerusalem to offer appropriate sacrifices in the Temple alongside a representative of Nineveh. This would resolve the tensions created in fourth and first chapters. — The unresolved tension begs readers to resolve theses tensions in their lives for Jonah.

F. How will this text be heard by individuals in the congregation, including the preacher?

  • Absent the context of Nineveh causing mayhem beyond justice, we might question Jonah’s anger.

IV. What do the commentaries have to say about the text?

Phyllis Trible (The New Interpreter’s Bible, “The Book of Jonah.” Abingdon, 1996.) attributes each chapter to separate traditions perhaps stitched together by an editor, as each could stand on their own as separate messages. The fourth chapter relates to the earlier chapters only by the name of the prophet and the city. She translates verse 1 as “And it was evil to Jonah, an evil great, and it burned to him.” Thus contrasting with verse 3:9 where God had turned “from the burning of his nostrils.” In discerning Jonah’s reason for fleeing Nineveh she asks if the reader can trust the reason he gives in 4:3. She reflects that God asked Jonah to reflect on his anger, neither affirming it nor condemning it, but pressing Jonah to consider what he will do with his anger.

Johanna W.H. Bos (Knox Preaching Guides: Ruth, Esther, Jonah. John Knox Press, 1986) attributes the popularity of this book to the myriad of theological issues presented and that “Jonah is everyone.” She supposes that Jonah’s “story could have been over at the end of chapter three, but it has a sequel, or second plot. Jonah is not left out of God’s concern. The prophet has some turning to do.” She suggests: “We are not asked to make a judgment on him, we are asked to make a judgment on God.” She concludes: “The pity shown to Nineveh became the cross that shines in the world’s darkness ate the blazing sun which smote Jonah’s head.”

V. With respect to the hearers (including the preacher), What does this text want to say and do?

Those times when my sermons were best received,
when parishioners came up and said: “I felt you were preaching directly to me,”
were those times when I was preaching to myself. — Rabbi Chet Diamond

A. What is the theological meaning of the verses?

The sailors repent, the whole city of Nineveh repents, but the hero of the story, Jonah, never actually repents nor asks forgiveness, unless it is what happens after the story ends. The open ending allows each reader to writer his or her name in the epilog, extending pity on those who would turn from righteousness.

February 26th: “Miracle of Forgiveness”

This Week’s Passage: Luke 7:36-50

Highlights: Jesus reverses those who are “in” and those who are “out”. Those who assumed they were saved by their works of righteousness are found guilty and those who recognize their debt before God are forgiven and go out in great joy. We can then come together as a community of forgiven sinners.

I. Establish the text

C. Texts for Year B on the 1stSunday in Lent

D. Brainstorm: What questions/thoughts come to mind?

36 Was this a normal occurrence for Jesus to be invited to dinner with Pharisees? cf Luke 15. The Pharisees note that Jesus welcomes sinners and eats with them.

37 Luke does not tell us what the woman’s sins were, so we may write in whatever we consider to be sinful.

38 “Feet” may also be used as a euphemism for genitals.

38 Why is does Luke note that the jar is alabaster, but not note what kind of perfume is in the jar? Alabaster is the necessary container for myrrh ointment because of its sensitivity to light.

39 NB those tears sufficient to wet are usually a sign of histrionics; pretend rather than genuine emotions.

41 denarii = a days wages for a common laborer. Thus: 8 hrs x $7.5 = $60. 500 denarii = $30,000. 50 denarii = $3,000

39-43 Jesus is challenged on applying the law and responds with his own question of legal implications.

47 The Greek is ambiguous about who is forgiven much and who is forgiven little. It is not a direct condemnation of Simon.

48 This is blasphemy! Only God can forgive sins! But Luke knew that Jesus was God.

F. Are there any significant variants in the manuscripts? Why?

  • In verse 47, many variants lack: “her many sins.” Thus leaving the phrase ambiguous about the gender of who is forgiven much or little.

II. Literary Study.

B. What parallel passages exist? How do they differ? How does this author’s intent differ from other authors? Is the text used elsewhere?

  • Matthew 26:6-13 – In Bethany, in the home of Simon, a man with a skin disease. The disciples complain about the waste. The anointing is received as preparation for burial. “Whenever the story is told it will be told in remembrance of her.”
  • Mark 14:3 – In Bethany, in the home of Simon the leper. “The people” become angry about the waste. Received as preparation for burial. “Whenever the story is told it will be told in remembrance of her.”
  • John 12:3 – In the house of Mary, the brother of Lazarus, in Bethany. Mary pours a pint of pure nard on his feet and wipes it with her hair. Judas complains. Received as preparation for burial.
  • Luke 7:36-50 – Luke’s theme is repentance and the accepting of forgiveness. He uses the pharisees repeatedly as being blind to accepting forgiveness of sins. This event occurs in Galilee early in Jesus’ ministry.

III. Question the text.

A. Observe the passage from the perspective of its characters.

The woman does not speak any words, and is only addressed directly at the end of the story, and remains nameless. The woman showed her love for Jesus in buying the expensive ointment and washing her feet with her tears. Simon does not acknowledge her aloud, only to himself. If not for Jesus, she might have remained anonymous and disappeared when the table had been cleared.

Simon becomes a metaphor for all of the pharisees, and by extension, all people who presume they are living within the law.

B. Are there any unusual details? Un-named characters? ‘Pointless’ description? Meanings of names of characters? What does a literal meaning of natural metaphors imply?

Some commentaries interpret the woman’s welcoming rituals as erotic. Could these actions be deliberately sensual to elicit revulsion from the reader as expressed by Simon?

C. What is the center of gravity of the text? Where was the author heading? What question did the author intend to answer? What is the emotional center of the text? What music would it call for?

  • Center of Gravity: All have sinned and owe a great debt to friends, neighbors, and especially to God. Those who recognize their sins and remorsefully repent, will receive forgiveness.
  • Music: “Amazing Grace”

D. Look for conflict: stated or implied.

  • The woman’s profuse love and gratitude as opposed to Simon’s reserved attitude toward Jesus.
  • The woman’s free and open penitence as opposed to Simon’s apparent feeling of not needing such penitence.
  • Jesus’ attitude toward the woman as opposed to Simon’s attitude toward her. “What she needs is a community of forgiven and forgiving sinners. This text screams for a church, not just any church but one that says,`You are welcome.'” (Craddock, Interpretation: Luke)

F. How will this text be heard by individuals in the congregation, including the preacher?

  • How big is my debt? Am I ignoring it or over playing my remorse?

IV. What do the commentaries have to say about the text?

Fred B. Craddock (Interpretation: Luke, John Knox Press, 1990) encourages readers to separate this encounter as recorded by Luke from other similar encounters recorded in the other Gospels. He cautions interpreters to avoid the erotic implications of how the woman provides the usual welcoming activities of feet washing, a kiss, and anointing. He asks “Where does one go when told by Christ ‘Go in peace’?”

R. Alan Culpepper (The New Interpreter’s Bible, “The Gospel of Luke”, Abingdon, 1995) places this unit as the culmination of other units demonstrating Jesus as more than a prophet. He suggests that Luke has used an older story that was mingled with stories of anointing Jesus prior to his death. He notes that first century dinners would have had a public component unknown today. [Would a dinner in a restaurant compare?] He acknowledges the sexual overtones of the woman’s actions and implications of being touched by someone who is ceremonially unclean. He notes that posing riddles was a normal part of dinner conversation. He clarifies that the woman loves Jesus and treats him kindly because she has been forgiven much (past perfect divine passive) by parallel with the riddle and at the same time not forgiven because she loved deeply. Under his reflections on the passage, Culpepper notes the double shame that Simon has suffered: (1) a harlot has entered his home and attended to his guest in the presence of his other guests and (2) Simon’s guest of honor has called attention to the host’s lack of hospitality.

V. With respect to the hearers (including the preacher), What does this text want to say and do?

Those times when my sermons were best received,
when parishioners came up and said: “I felt you were preaching directly to me,”
were those times when I was preaching to myself. — Rabbi Chet Diamond

A. What is the theological meaning of the verses?

Jesus reverses the ins and the outs. Those who assumed they were saved by their works of righteousness are found guilty and those who recognize their debt before God are forgiven and go out in great joy. We can then come together as a community of forgiven sinners.

B. Focus Statement: Central, controlling, unifying theme.

We are ineligible to sit at the table where we assume we belong. But, once we come before Christ to whom we owe the debt, we find the debt canceled.

C. Function Statement: What change in the hearer?

Realize that we sit too much of the time at the table with the Pharisees, sure of our righteousness and acting within the law, only to be found guilty of gross breeches of hospitality. Realizing our guilt we too come penitently before God who grants us grace. Realizing the gift of grace we go out with great rejoicing.

February 19th: “Open the Jar”

This Week’s Passage: 2 Corinthians 4:3-7

Highlights: How we live and preach illustrates not our lives, but the glory of Christ who shines through us. Hearers are inspired to let the light of the gospel shine through them.

I. Establish the text

C. Other texts for Year B for Sunday, February 19thin Ordinary Time

D. Brainstorm: What questions/thoughts come to mind?

2 What “shameful things” did Paul hide? How did his opponents distort God’s word? When has/does the Church distort God word? Do we skew our presentation of the gospel to build up the visible church?

3-4 Vociferous anti-religious comments on news articles even tangentially related to faith testify to the failure of the church to clearly present God’s grace to those who are perishing and the veiling of God’s word by the god of this world.

5 Building up Christ reflects well on those unconcerned about personal or organizational success.

6 What is Paul quoting? Is this an allusion to a hymn also cited in John 1:5?

7 Did Paul want us associate a light in clay jars with Gideon’s hiding torches in clay jars when the LORD defeated the Midianites? Judges 7 clearly portrays the glory of God as delivering victory and not the power of Israel.

E. Reconsider where the text begins and ends: What got chopped out?

  • Preceding paragraph compares the veiling of the glory of God in the old law with freedom in Christ as illustrated by the veil that Moses wore to ally the fear of the Israelites.
  • Paul’s rhetoric is complicated! Limiting the pericope to verses 3-7 helps to focus and clarify the material. The preacher will need to provide background to the themes Paul has introduced.
  • Following this passage, Paul unpacks what he means by a treasure in clay jars, underscoring human frailty and the glory of Gods’ word.

F. Are there any significant variants in the manuscripts? Why?

  • Does verse 6 end: “in the face of Christ” or “in the face of Jesus Christ” or “in the face of Christ Jesus”? If Paul had omitted the word “Jesus”, scribes may have added it either before or after the word “Christ” to emphasize the incarnation, which would be consistent with the rest of the paragraph.

II. Literary Study.

A. What is the history of the text? Who wrote it? When? In what social context? What Historical/Religious/Sociological factors influenced its writing?

  • This letter follows a harsh letter that the Corinthians had received from Paul. It explains why Paul canceled a visit he had planned. It alludes to Paul’s fear that his presence would sadden the Corinthians and someone who was punished, but now should be forgiven.

C. Review syntax/meanings of critical words, phrases, idioms

  • The veiling of the gospel alludes to Moses veiling his face (see Exodus 34:29-35). After speaking with God, Moses’ face shone brightly, creating fear among the people. Paul may have been accused of veiling the gospel. Paul does not deny the presence of a veil, but attributes it to the blindness of unbelievers.

III. Question the text.

C. What is the center of gravity of the text? Where was the author heading? What question did the author intend to answer? What is the emotional center of the text? What music would it call for?

  • Center of Gravity: Any opacity of the preaching the gospel comes from the blindness of unbelievers.
  • Emotional Center: The brilliance of God’s word transcends the frailty of those entrusted to carry it.
  • Music: “Arise Your Light Has Come”, “Lift High the Cross”, “Holy Spirit, Truth Divine”

D. Look for conflict: stated or implied.

  • Foolishness of entrusting treasure to clay jars rather than a safe.

F. How will this text be heard by individuals in the congregation, including the preacher?

  • The rhetoric of verses 1-6 is too convoluted for modern ears, but it is essential to unpacking verse 7.

IV. What do the commentaries have to say about the text?

J. Paul Sampley (The New Interpreter’s Bible, “The Second Letter to the Corinthians”. Abingdon, 2000.) treats all of chapter 3 and the first 6 verses of chapter 4 as one pericope. He comments that Paul freely interlaces from the story of Moses and the law chiseled onto stone tablets (Exodus 34:29-35) and Jeremiah’s prophecy of God writing a new covenant upon human hearts (Jeremiah 31:31-34). Similarly, Sampley sees in 4:1-6 Paul contrasting his use of the gospel with the preaching of his opponents.

Ralph Martin (Word Biblical Commentary: 2 Corinthians. Word, 1986.) dismisses the idea that the treasure in clay jars has any dependencies on Judges 7:16-20 and favors relating the fragility of clay vessels, especially clay lamps, to human fragility. He offers an illustration that wine cannot “be stored in golden or sliver vessels, but only in the least among vessels, an earthenware one, so also the Torah can be kept only with one who is humble in his own eyes.”

William Baird (Knox Preaching Guides: 1 Corinthians | 2 Corinthians. JKP, 1980.) sees Paul paraphrasing Genesis 1:3-4 when he says “It is God who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness.’”

V. With respect to the hearers (including the preacher), What does this text want to say and do?

Those times when my sermons were best received,
when parishioners came up and said: “I felt you were preaching directly to me,”
were those times when I was preaching to myself. — Rabbi Chet Diamond

A. What is the theological meaning of the verses?

How we live and preach illustrates not our lives, but the glory of Christ who shines through us.

C. Function Statement: What change in the hearer?

Hearers are inspired to let the light of the gospel shine through them.

February 12th: “I Choose You”

This Week’s Passage: Gospel Mark 1:40-45

Highlights: Jesus risks physical and social well being to cleanse a leper. How do we need to be cleaned? Who do we need to reach out to?

I. Establish the text

C. Other texts for Year B for Sunday, February 12thin Ordinary Time

D. Brainstorm: What questions/thoughts come to mind?

40 Would this have been difficult for the leper? Or would his leprosy have driven him to the point of grabbing at every straw? How did he overcome the social stigma and separation?

41 It is not our choice, but Christ’s choice to reach out and touch.

42 What do we wish to be cleansed from

43 Is there an implication that Jesus warned the leper not to worship him or idolized him for the physical healing apart from the spiritual healing?

44 Go and worship God as you were instructed.

45 How would this look today? Is this the error of worshiping the medium rather than the message?

E. Reconsider where the text begins and ends: What got chopped out?

  • This could be seen as an example of Jesus casting out demons mentioned in v. 39. Beginning the story with v. 35 places this missionary trek in the context of prayer.
  • This passage shifts Jesus from generic healings to theological healing. In the next passage a paralytic man is restored by receiving forgiveness of sins. By parallel, cleansing equals forgiveness as both mean restoration to community.

F. Are there any significant variants in the manuscripts? Why?

  • A few variants omit “and kneeling down” in verse 40 and others change verse 41 from “being filled with compassion” to “was angry”. But these are less reliable manuscripts.

II. Literary Study.

B. What parallel passages exist? How do they differ? How does this author’s intent differ from other authors? Is the text used elsewhere?

  • Matt 8:2-4 – Omits Jesus’ feelings of compassion. Omits the leper’s freely proclaiming being healed and the impact of notoriety on Jesus’ preaching.
  • Luke 5:12-16 – Omits Jesus’ feelings of compassion. Generalizes the notoriety that the healing gave Jesus.

D. What is the literary style of the text? And how does it affect the reading? What does a poetic form do to the meaning? Lament/Praise/Petition? Any subtle variations in the repetitions? What is emphasized/minimized by the repetition?

  • Including Jesus’ feelings helps emphasize his humanity.
  • Clean appears 4 times: The leper asks to be made clean. Jesus chooses to make him clean. The leper was made clean. And he was commanded to make an offering for cleansing. Cleanliness would have restored the leper to community, thus his first act would be to worship God who made him clean.

III. Question the text.

A. Observe the passage from the perspective of its characters.

Leper: Came hoping that Jesus would cleanse him and was so elated he could no longer contain himself.

Jesus: Jesus was dismayed (perhaps even angry) that the community had deemed lepers untouchable. Thus touch demonstrated the leper’s restoration to community.

C. What is the center of gravity of the text? Where was the author heading? What question did the author intend to answer? What is the emotional center of the text? What music would it call for?

Center: Demonstrate Jesus willingness to violate social norms to restore people to community.

Music: “There Is a Balm in Gilead”

D. Look for conflict: stated or implied.

  • Lepers were supposed to announce their uncleanliness so no one would inadvertently touch them. Yet Jesus intentionally touches the man before he is made clean and before he presents himself to the priest and thus remove the requirement to announce his uncleanliness.

F. How will this text be heard by individuals in the congregation, including the preacher?

  • Pokemon refrain, “I choose you!” Does this reflect a need in our community to be chosen?
  • I sat next to a drunk while he waited for AA to start and I waited for my meeting to start. “Never sat next to a preacher before. Can I shake your hand?”
  • Country song: “Put me in coach, I’m ready to play”.

IV. What do the commentaries have to say about the text?

Lamar Williamson, Jr. (Interpretation: Mark. John Knox Press, 1983.) favors reading Jesus’ feeling anger in verse 41 as it is the more difficult reading and fits with the verbs used in verse 43 and anticipates this healing interrupting and impeding his work. He interprets Jesus command to offer sacrifice as affirming Jesus respect of the Jewish law and affirming ritual as completing restoration to community. He cautions against presuming that “God always wills healing” and against using healing ministries to attract converts or make healing a central ministry of the Church.

Pheme Perkins (The New Interpreter’s Bible, “Gospel of Mark”. Abingdon, 1995.) expands the pericope to include verses 29 through 45, making this episode the capstone of a series of healings. She notes that the formula “If you will, you can” appears in ancient prayers, acknowledging the sovereignty of gods in healing, thus modeling the correct method of praying for healing.

V. With respect to the hearers (including the preacher), What does this text want to say and do?

Those times when my sermons were best received,
when parishioners came up and said: “I felt you were preaching directly to me,”
were those times when I was preaching to myself. — Rabbi Chet Diamond

A. What is the theological meaning of the verses?

  • To follow Christ is to risk social and physical well being to restore people to community.

B. Focus Statement: Central, controlling, unifying theme.

  • We want Jesus to choose us. But only God’s will matters.

C. Function Statement: What change in the hearer?

  • Recognize that while God desires us to be in community, our well being is subject to God’s will not our request.

Celebrating the Lord’s Supper in Easter 2012

Bread and cup“Teach the congregation about the depth of meaning in the Lord’s Supper, not just with words, but also with how we celebrate Communion,” the Elders on Session challenged. In addition to serving communion every Sunday in Easter, they wanted more. Thus we are now scheduled serve communion eleven times in ten weeks (including Maundy Thursday and the first Sundays of April and June).

Worship Plans for Easter 2012

These worship plans are tentative and subject to revision. Suggestions will be carefully considered.

Date

Theme

Implementation

April 1
Passion Sunday
Isaiah 50:4-9a – Christ: God’s Forgiveness
Remembrance of God’s grace, Christ’s sacrifice, and work of the Spirit.
Communion as Atonement
Small cups & wafers served to participants in pews
Christ’s Body given & Blood shed for us.
April 5
Maundy Thursday
Sin as slavery; Orderly plan of freedom.
Institution of the Lord’s Supper
Passover Meal: Unleavened bread, wine
April 8
Resurrection
Mark 16:1-8 – You are looking for Jesus
Gift of God through Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit
High formality. Sung responses.
Child delivers elements gift wrapped.
Participants come forward to receive bread and small cups.
April 15
Easter 2
Acts 4:32-35 – Everything in Common
Reconciling community
Sit in a circle, minister to one another.
Intinction with one loaf
April 22
Easter 3
Youth Group skit
The resurrection has implications today.
Youth serve with modernized setting: Bread sticks in a pizza box, Grape Kool-Aid in plastic cups
April 29
Easter 4
John 10:11-18 – Good Shepherd
Eucharist is our great sacrifice of praise to God.
Each family presents a slice of bread during the offering. Those slices are shared during communion.
May 6
Easter 5
John 15:1-8 – On Christ’s Vine
Incorporation
One loaf divided and shared with cups in pews. Elder and Deacons immediately leave worship to offer communion to those unable to attend.
May 13
Easter 6
John 15:9-17 – Love one another
Spirit filled symbol of God’s Love
Women of the Church
Heart shaped pieces of bread
May 20
Easter 7
John 17:6-19 – Christ glorified in disciples
Sanctification
Wedding Feast: Invitations sent with a “robe”
Wedding runner & Unity Candle
Table filled with food: Fish, milk, wine, honey, salt, …, braided bread.
May 27
Pentecost
Acts 2:1-21 – God pours out the Holy Spirit
Confirmation
Give all members a red stole
Confirmands get white stoles
Give red stoles after confirmation
June 3
Trinity Sunday
John 3:1-17 – Born of water and spirit.
Rebirth
Flour and oil dedicated as a sin offering after assurance of pardon. Children shape flour into pastry and bake it during sermon to be served for communion.

Other Notes:

  1. Commend using the unison prayer after communion as a prayer before meals.
  2. Add explanatory notices in bulletin beginning in Lent, March Newsletter, and email March 21 – May 23.
  3. Families invited to bring bread for one of Sunday.